A Rule of the Park (Boston Tales)

My daughters wandered off the playground and onto a path at the park. Francine was playing with the water fountain, and Carolina was curious about two dogs running nearby. She toddled over to see the dogs.

The dogs were with a woman – she was wearing a sweatshirt with a large red H – Harvard. I saw another woman walking nearby – she was wearing a Yale sweatshirScreen Shot 2017-06-04 at 7.08.46 AMt. I never know any fashion trends. I had on a plain black top, plain black pants, and flip-flops.

One of the Harvard woman’s dogs went really close to Carolina – the dog’s mouth looked disgusting. Large pointed teeth, drool, and matted fur (from the drool). The dog was grey – it wasn’t that big. I picked up Carolina, and Francine continued playing in the water fountain.


The woman turned to me.

She said,”My dogs are really friendly. My 2 year old niece plays with them all the time.”

I said,”It’s not that – it’s just that it’s a rule of the park to have dogs on a leash.”

Signs are posted all around the park that say: Leash, curb, and clean up after your dog. Each sign has a visual of the silhouette of a man with a do
g on a leash and a bag in his hand.

The woman turned to her dogs,”Come on. Come on.” She leashed her dogs and brought them to her car in the nearby parking lot. My daughters and I stayed at the water fountain. The woman then walked back towards us and approached me. “You know – it’s not a rule of the park, but it’s a complete waste of water to let your daughter play with that fountain.”

I just looked right at her, but I didn’t say anything. I was wearing sunglasses, but I still did my best penetrating stare.She walked back towards her car. As she was opening the door, another car pulled up. The driver was a woman, and she had a dog in the backseat.

The Harvard woman began to talk to the second dog lady who was getting out of her car. She was talking loudly – she was broadcasting from the parking lot, and she wanted me to hear her

“You better leash your dog. This little mom over there is hyper about her kids being by a dog that’s off leash. She’s going around saying it’s a rule of the park. I’m actually leaving. Maybe you want to go to.”

Harvard woman then got in her car and drove off. The second dog lady walked her dog to a field a ways away from the water fountain. She played with her dog, off leash. She was not near us. We went back to playing with the water fountain.

BPL’s Bibliocycle: The Intersection of Produce and Picture Books

Growing up in the suburbs of Baltimore in the 80’s and 90’s, I visited the local farm stand plenty of times. It was a wooden shack on the side of the road with an awning, vegetables, and fruits. There was nothing there for kids specifically…I mean, yeah, you could get some strawberries or corn if you were into that as a kid (I was), but believe me, there was nothing special for kids to “do” there while adults bought their produce and maybe a jar of jelly.

Fast forward to my infant daughters’ lives here in Roslindale – City of Boston – in 2014. They are so lucky because the farmers’ market is not a farm stand…it’s an event! And plenty of it is for kids.

This past weekend, however, was particularly special because the Boston Public Library’s Bibliocycle came to the Roslindale Farmers’ Market.

bouncyhouse

The witch in Hansel and Gretel used a candy cottage to lure children to an oven. However, the Farmers’ Market  just uses a diabetic-friendly bouncy house to gently guide children towards the Bibliocycle.

funtimes

Cool books on comfortable mats – the perfect summer day for a young bookworm!

KidsBikeDay

The Bibliocycle was part of a special bike day at the Farmers’ Market.

tent

A sturdy tent protected the bookworms (and the books) from sunburn.

thebibliocycle2

The cycle is stocked with food-themed picture books – and my personal favorite is Dragons Love Tacos!

veggiebooks

A child-size table featured books about veggies.

 

Best of all, two friendly librarians greeted all those who visited the Bibliocycle. You could even check out books!

Best of all, two friendly librarians, Amanda Bressler (left) and  June Thammasnong (right), greeted all those who visited the Bibliocycle. They even helped patrons check out books with their library cards!

 

 

Window “Stopping” for Poetry in Brookline Village

While strolling through Brookline Village this morning, my whole family stopped to admire an awesome display of poetry in the windows of The Children’s Book Shop. Typed poems are printed on large poster boards along with the signature of each poet. Best of all, this public exhibition of poetry is written by children in grades K to 8.

After some online sleuthing, I learned that the poems displayed were winners of the annual Children’s Book Shop Poetry contest, held in honor of National Poetry Month in April. I photographed several of my favorite poems, but a complete listing can be found on the contest’s webpage.

 

The awning of The Children's Book Shop in Brookline Village, Massachusetts

The awning of The Children’s Book Shop in Brookline Village, Massachusetts

 

A great conversation piece poem for young children: "What else can you think of that roars?"

A great conversation piece poem for young children: “What else can you think of that roars?”

 

A poem of familial gratitude

A poem of familial gratitude

A perfect poem for summer

A perfect poem for summer

Short, sweet, savory, hilarious!

Short, sweet, savory, hilarious!