Middle School Students Accurately Predict Boston’s Next Mayor

Yesterday, students in Academy 2 at the Lilla G. Frederick Pilot Middle School voted in a Mock Election. Prior to the election, students created campaign posters and completed Voter Registration forms. Students with completed registration forms cast their vote for Boston’s next mayor.

The Mock Election

56 students in grades 6, 7, and 8 participated in the election. Martin J. Walsh won the Mock Election, and he also won the City of Boston Election to become Boston’s next mayor. 42 of our Frederick students voted for Marty Walsh, 13 voted for John Connolly, and 1 students voted for both candidates. This vote was discarded.

Our wonderful Lilla G. Frederick Technology Coordinator Victor Woodroffe streamed the Mock Election Live on You Tube.

The Days Leading Up to the Election

Students used the candidates' website to research their personal histories and views on issues.

Students used the candidates’ website to research their personal histories and views on issues.

Students completed graphic organizers to record information from the websites.

Students completed graphic organizers to record information from the websites.

John Connolly Graphic Organizer

John Connolly Graphic Organizer

Students compared and contrasted the Mayoral Candidates.

Students compared and contrasted the Mayoral Candidates.

After researching and comparing the candidates, students formed their opinion about who they supported in the race.

After researching and comparing the candidates, students formed their opinion about who they supported in the race.

Many students supported Martin J. Walsh.

Many students supported Martin J. Walsh.

MW4

MW3

MW2

A few students supported John Connolly.

A few students supported John Connolly.

Today’s Classwork and Homework

I have created an adapted text and summary lesson for today, using the New York Times’ article on the Mayoral Race. You can download the lesson materials here: Post-Election Lesson Materials.

Boston’s Mayoral Race 2013 Lesson Plan: Persuasive Campaign Posters

Dear Readers:

In order for our students to participate in the historic 2013 election in Boston, I have created a Boston’s Mayoral Race Campaign Poster Lesson Plan that instructs students in how to research, compare, and select their choice of mayoral candidate. Then, students create a persuasive campaign poster that convinces other students to vote for their chosen candidate. Please feel free to edit these lesson plans as needed to fit the needs of your students and schools.
These activities deliberately address two Common Core standards that we are working on at the Lilla G. Frederick Pilot Middle School, a Boston Public middle school.
MA RI7.6 Craft and structure analyze, compare and contrast information in text at a 7th grade level

MA RI7.6 Craft and structure analyze, compare and contrast information in text at a 7th grade level
Students in our academy (small section of the school) will be given voter registration forms next Monday, and students must bring in their voter registration forms on Tuesday to vote in the Mock Election and receive candy!
Last year, our students very much enjoyed our mock presidential election. (See here: https://literacychange.org/2012/11/06/middle-school-students-vote-in-a-mock-election/).
It is really fun for the students to feel like a part of history!!!
Best,
Jennifer Dines, M.Ed., C.A.S.

Boston: Don’t Forget to Vote Today!

I am about to go to my local polling place right now. Tomorrow, any of my students who know the names of the candidates who will be running for mayor in the November election will receive candy.

My Ballot Choices

Mayor:

Felix Arroyo

City Councilor At Large: 

Ayanna Pressley

Stephen J. Murphy

Annissa Essaibi George

City Councilor District 5:

Mimi E. Turchinetz

Ask the Reading Specialist: Helping Your Reading Challenged Child

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I will be doing a special talk for parents and families this Wednesday at the Roslindale Branch of the Library. At the end of the session, I will also demonstrate some games and techniques for helping children and teens learn Dolch words. I will also have handouts and resources for the audience to take home. I am really looking forward to this presentation because it is a way to use my education and knowledge to help in my community.

Scientific Literacy at the Roslindale Farmers’ Market

While wandering through the booths filled with edible greens, baked goods, and handmade soaps at the Roslindale Farmers’ Market on this muggy Saturday morning, I spotted a sign with the word “Literacy” and magnetically fluttered towards it like a moth drawn to light.

The sign read:

Boston University ALES: Advocates for Literacy in Environmental Science

Boston University ALES: Advocates for Literacy in Environmental Science

Attached to the sign was a table with scientific instruments and props. And behind the table were the ALES themselves!

Three of the ALES with their scientific tools at the Roslindale Farmers' Market

Three of the ALES with their scientific tools at the Roslindale Farmers’ Market

I learned that the ALES are a group of Boston University graduate student scientists who travel to various locations (including public schools) to promote science by providing explanations and demonstrations of what scientists do. Their goal is to create public awareness of the contributions that scientists make to society. They strive to show that scientists do not exist  in “ivory tower” laboratories, but rather solve problems and study phenomenon presented by the world. The ALES certainly proved their capability to meet their objectives through their delightful demonstrations this morning.

The demonstration below served to personify soil by showing that it is a breathing entity that exhales carbon dioxide.

The breathing soil with a CO2 monitor

The breathing soil with a CO2 monitor

Maple woods, like the strips seen here, makes up the floors of bowling alleys.

Maple woods, like the strips seen here, makes up the floors of bowling alleys.

The prop above shows the growth of various maples. A member of the ALES informed me that maples are used to construct the floors of bowling alleys.

133 year old Red Spruce

133 year old Red Spruce

I learned that some species of trees do not deal well with shade, but they grow very quickly with enough sunlight. However, species that can tolerate shade often outlive sun-worshipping species. The BU ALES explained this as “Tortise and the Hare” syndrome. I also learned that I can classify the Red Spruce as a “tortoise” because it is able to withstand shade.

The BU ALES offered a variety of fungi to grow at home.

The BU ALES offered a variety of fungi and plants to grow at home.

Finally, the BU ALES offered goody bags of plants and fungi to grow in your home, and they explain to you how to create appropriate soils and containers for your goodies.

The 20 minutes or so at the BU ALES booth enriched my meager knowledge of environmental scientists, and I will definitely be contacting them in the fall to arrange for them to visit my classroom. I cannot wait to learn more from them and enhance my scientific literacy. Thank you to the BU ALES for promoting literacy in our community!

The Boston University Advocates for Literacy in Environmental Sciences are available for school visits and public presentations. Please contact ales@bu.edu for more information.

Boston Public Schools Student of the Week: Clayton Rodrigues

I am so proud of my 7th grade student, Clayton Rodrigues. Clayton came to the United States from Cape Verde only a few years ago, and now he is not only an excellent student, but he is also captain of the school wrestling team as well as a talented actor who has performed in two school plays.

I nominated Clayton for Boston Public Schools Student of the Week, and he was chosen from more than 56,000 students in our school system.

Clayton was interviewed by Boston Arts Academy alumni Zakiyyah Sutton, a talented broadcaster who also works in City Councilor Tito Jackson‘s office.

Clayton is interviewed by Ms. Sutton in my classroom.

Clayton is interviewed by Ms. Sutton in my classroom.

The interview was broadcast on Monday Morning as part of the Councilor’s Corner radio program on TOUCH 106.1.

What an honor for Clayton to be selected! I am so proud! Note: Clayton’s writing is also featured in our recent publication: Being Bostonian.

Clayon and Ms. Sutton pose in front of the Lilla G. Frederick’s “Celebrating Diversity” mural.

Being Bostonian: How We Make Boston Strong

Dear Readers:

 I am very pleased to share my students’ latest e-book publication with all of you. It is titled “Being Bostonian: How We Make Boston Strong”, and it is a collection of essays which share how our students, their families, communities, and our school contribute to the City of Boston’s strength. My students have worked diligently to create this publication for Mayor Menino and the Boston Police Department as a humble thank you for all of their courage during all of the recent events.
In a time of great uncertainty, this collection of essays serves as a powerful reminder of why I teach. The students’ writing is expressive and sophisticated, capturing their identities and their dreams for the future. I cannot believe that I am so privileged to work with this group of young people.
Thank you, Jennifer Dines
Being Bostonian (download)